Why the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights must not be transposed into UK law

By Bryn Harris, D Phil (Oxon)

20 Nov 2017

Tomorrow, the House of Commons will debate whether to transpose the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights into UK law after Brexit. The Government’s European Union (Withdrawal) Bill proposes not to transpose it, while a number of opposition MPs, and some rebels on the government backbenches, have tabled amendments proposing that it be retained as part of UK domestic law.

In our Lawyers for Britain paper, The Charter of Fundamental Rights in UK law after Brexit: Why the Charter should not be transposed, we argue that the Government is right to deny the Charter a place in UK law after exit. Citizens agree to be ruled by law because it rules our society – and its institutions – in a way that is predictable and certain: the Charter is neither certain nor predictable in its operation, and so must be rejected if the UK is serious about preserving the proper rule of law.

The Charter, if retained, would overlap with our existing human rights regimes – the European Convention on Human Rights (as incorporated by the Human Rights Act 1998), which the Charter substantially duplicates but can also exceed, and the common law. As the Human Rights Act and the common law will regulate the body of retained EU law, it is difficult to see what extra value the Charter would add (apart from all the extra, possibly lucrative work for lawyers) that would justify the price to be paid in retaining it. Continue reading “Why the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights must not be transposed into UK law”

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