The Phase 1 Deal: Costly EU demands on regulatory alignment could prevent us securing trade deals elsewhere

By Martin Howe QC

Our government on our behalf is offering to pay the EU around €45-50 billion of money that we don’t legally owe, to submit to our courts and our Parliament being overruled by a wholly foreign court after we have left the EU, and to commit to keep our regulation in agriculture and possibly other fields “aligned” with the EU in order to resolve the Irish border issue. This is all so that we can reach the nirvana of having not an actual trade deal, but just talks about a trade deal. Continue reading “The Phase 1 Deal: Costly EU demands on regulatory alignment could prevent us securing trade deals elsewhere”

EU citizens’ rights and ECJ references

We must not submit to an unequal treaty, nor be taken in by “voluntary” referrals

By Martin Howe QC, 27 November 2017

When we leave the European Union on 29th March 2019, we shall automatically regain control of our laws and our courts. No foreign court will have the right to overrule British courts, or tell us what laws our courts must enforce within the UK.

We do not need the permission of the European Union or of anyone else to achieve this, which is the normal position in any sovereign, independent state. The only way we could fail to achieve this is if through an act of craven, self-harming stupidity we were voluntarily to agree to being ruled over by a foreign court.

It is therefore a matter of dismay to see stories (such as that written by James Forsyth in The Sun on 27 November 2017) saying that non-attributable sources are indicating that the government may be contemplating a so-called “compromise” proposal under which UK courts would make preliminary references for rulings by the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg on questions to do with EU citizens’ rights. Continue reading “EU citizens’ rights and ECJ references”

Perpetuating ECJ jurisdiction after Brexit

Sir Keir Starmer’s obsessive love affair with the Luxembourg Court

By Martin Howe QC

14 Nov 2017

Under the EU treaties, Judges and Advocates-General who serve on the ECJ and the EU General Court at Luxembourg must be nationals of a Member State. So when the UK leaves European Union at just before midnight on 29 March 2019, the British nationals who are currently serving in these roles will cease to hold office.

As a result, what is currently a multi-national court in which we participate will become an entirely foreign court.

But strangely, Labour’s Brexit spokesman, Sir Keir Starmer QC, is seeking to perpetuate in every conceivable way the jurisdiction of this foreign court over the UK after we have left the EU. He wrote to the Prime Minister demanding that the ECJ should continue to exercise jurisdiction over the UK during any transitional period, and threatened an amendment to the EU Withdrawal Bill to make this happen if the PM does not agree. And on Monday 13 November 2017,  in a BBC interview, he argued that the ECJ should have jurisdiction over the UK for the indefinite future where we wish to enter into arrangements with EU agencies.

However, it is virtually unheard of in international relations for an independent sovereign state to agree to subject itself to the jurisdiction of a foreign court. One has to go back to the 19th Century to find examples such as the (British) Supreme Court for China sitting in Shanghai, which exercised jurisdiction over British subjects in China and over their disputes with Chinese nationals to the exclusion of Chinese courts. Continue reading “Perpetuating ECJ jurisdiction after Brexit”

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